Reviews

“Uncommon Malta + Gozo ably presents Malta and its neighbouring island, Gozo, in a refreshingly different way to the usual travel agency billing of sea, sand and sun”

Domus

*** 

“Uncommon Stockholm is the essence of its name, with a distinctive and more personable take on guiding people to Stockholm and even providing residents – who don’t need a guide – an enjoyable and relatable read.”

Totally Stockholm     

*** 

“…writers, photographers, graphic designers describe the destination and how it is best experienced through art, maps and words.”

The Nordic Nomad

***

“Not just for tourists, this book is also relevant for residents- engaging, wistful and intimate, Uncommon Dubai is a celebration of this great city.”

Dubai Confidential

***

“Through personal journeys and local knowledge, Uncommon Stockholm attempts to bring the readers closer to the true life of the city”

Radar

***

“Uncommon Dubai takes readers on an intimate tour of the city, offering insights into the lives of some of its artistic residents through prose, poetry, illustration and photography”

Time out Dubai

***

“ …In these photos I actually recognize the Dubai and Cairo I know”

Arablit

***

“many of the stories [in Uncommon Dubai] are about connecting with Dubai’s diverse inhabitants, rather than simply admiring the view”

Vision

***

“Uncommon Mata + Gozo : An intimate novel bringing a passionate insight of various contributors and a distinctive design impression by resident British artist Jon Banthorpe. Triggering the mind of Emma Mattei, the culprit of this uncommon project, were writings like those in Granta publications, which are simple absent from the local scene.”

Redwhite

***

“To use the term guidebook would be to place it alongside Lonely Plant, DK and Rough Guides on the bookshelf, its rather an experience book, providing anecdotes of great experiences within the city.”

Cent magazine

***

“You’ll learn a lot. It’s a good book to tumble into while sitting in a park; to nudge a reverie on what London means to the reader; and to think again about those around us, and what uncommon stories they could tell”

Londonist